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Archive for the 'Maths/Science' Category

Presented and produced by Seán Delaney.

This week on the programme I interview five colleagues who participated recently in an Erasmus+ project titled EDUCATE. This project involved developing materials for teachers, providing providing professional development, and conducting research on how to combine challenge and differentiated instruction in the teaching of mathematics at pre-primary, primary and post-primary levels. Project materials are available here. The guests on the programme are Charalambos Charalambous from the University of Cyprus, Ann Marie Gurhy from the Marino Institute of Education, Despina Potari from the University of Athens, João Pedro da Ponte from the University of Lisbon, and Evridiki Kasapi from the University of Cyprus. Among the topics we discuss are:

  • Realising that mathematics is more than memorisation and drill and practice.
  • How the study of differentiated instruction and challenge in mathematics came about
  • What it means to introduce challenge to mathematics tasks
  • An overview of differentiated instruction
  • Using enablers and extenders to promote differentiated instruction
  • Why a teacher needs to know a student’s cognitive, social and affective needs in order to differentiate
  • Observing teachers’ needs in differentiating and providing challenge through reading research and observing lessons
  • Developing materials to support teachers
  • Using video clubs as a model of teacher professional development
  • Challenges teacher encounter when working with challenging tasks
  • The difference between video clubs and lesson study
  • Overview of the modules created as part of the project (each module is based around a number of cases of practice)

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Presented and produced by Seán Delaney.

On this week's programme I speak to Dr. Liz Dunphy, Associate Professor of Early Childhood Education in Dublin City University's Institute of Education about her work. Among the topics we discuss are the following:

 

 

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Presented and produced by Seán Delaney

On this week's podcast I speak to Professor Paola Valero from Stockholm University about the political aspects of teaching in general and of teaching mathematics in particular. Professor Valero was in Ireland as a keynote speaker at the 2019 Mathematics Education in Ireland conference, which was held in Dublin City University in October.

This podcast will be of interest to anyone who likes to stand back from their teaching and think about the why, what and how of their work. Among the topics we discuss in the podcast are:

  • The difference between teacher knowledge and researcher knowledge and why both need to work together
  • Responsibilities of researchers (in education)
  • Relevance of her work on the politics of mathematics education for teachers
  • Why teachers’ work is inevitably political, whether or not that is acknowledged
  • How can teachers become more aware of their political stance (from 12’06”)
  • What it means to be a teacher-intellectual
  • What is political specifically in mathematics education
    • Working with powerful and empowering knowledge
    • It is a desired area of competence/it is highly valued
    • Mathematics is widely assessed
  • A brief history of how the status of mathematics in schools evolved
  • How less was expected of girls in mathematics education
  • The experience of learning mathematics for immigrants and people with disabilities
  • How teachers can respond to the political nature of mathematics

She recommended the work of Ole Skovsmose and in particular the chapter he co-wrote with Lene Nielsen, Critical Mathematics Education.

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Presented and produced by Seán Delaney.

On this week's podcast I bring you interviews from students, teachers and organisers who attended the National Finals of Scifest 2019 in Marino Institute of Education on Friday, 22 November. Among the guests I speak to are the following:

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Presented and produced by Seán Delaney.

On this week's Inside Education I bring you another chance to meet with Jane Shimizu where she tells us about her participation in Science on Stage over the midterm break. We also discuss the participation of her class in the Scoil Féile Drámaíochta. From research I bring some insights around education and sleep following my reading of Matthew Walker's book, Why We Sleep.

Among the topics I discuss with Jane Shimizu are the following:

  • Her participation in the Science on Stage Festival this week in Portugal, representing Irish teachers.
  • Getting children interested in science through space using projectiles and rockets
  • How she makes mouse, toilet roll, air, straw and foam projectiles with her class
  • The science and maths that can be based around foam projectiles
  • Making predictions and recording answers to questions
  • Using controls and the importance of fair tests
  • How she times activities to coincide with Space Week.
  • Sharing work with other classes and hosting a space display day for parents.
  • Structuring lessons around projectiles and rockets and how they provide integration opportunities with several other curriculum subjects.
  • What happens when questions arise to which she does not know the answer.
  • Online resources: https://www.dltk-teach.com/, https://www.safesearchkids.com/.
  • Her school’s website. Here are some of the links Jane recommended.
  • Recommended sources for ideas and materials for teaching about space and science from ESERO and Science Foundation Ireland.
  • Her class, which is in a school serving an area traditionally associated with disadvantage, participates in An Féile Scoildrámaíochta by entering a musical each year. Because many of the available scripts are intended for students in Gaelscoileanna and Gaeltacht schools, Jane writes her own scripts for her class.
  • How she prepares the class during the school year for staging the musical

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Presented and produced by Seán Delaney

On this week's programme I bring you a special episode for Maths Week and to mark the seventh conference of Mathematics Education in Ireland held last weekend in Dublin City University's Institute of Education. First I speak to Dr. Siún Nic Mhuirí (from 1'43") from Dublin City University about the Maths4All project she's working on. Among the topics we discuss are:

  • The Maths4All website and resources
  • Alan Schoenfeld's Teaching for Robust Understanding (TRU) framework
  • Challenges of developing video representations of teaching
  • Pre-service teachers’ self-efficacy in teaching mathematics
  • Her thoughts on this year’s Mathematics Education in Ireland conference
  • A message about the importance of believing that maths is for all students

Next I speak to Dr. Natthapoj Vincent Trakulphadetkrai from the University of Reading (from 15' 51") about using picture story books to teach mathematics.We discuss the following:

  • His goal to have mathematics picture story books used in both primary and secondary schools to teach mathematics
  • Why picture books can help students learn abstract topics
  • Handa’s Surprise
  • Sir Cumference series
  • Using a picture book to provide context for a lesson
  • Reading a story to apply learning to help characters in a story solve a problem
  • How to use a maths picture story book in a mathematics lesson
  • Benefits of using maths picture story books
  • How children react to using maths picture story books in maths class
  • Children writing their own maths picture story books
  • Papert’s theory of constructionism
  • When should maths picture story books be used in mathematics teaching
  • His website mathsthroughstories.org
  • His view of effective mathematics teaching
  • The journey that brought him from Thailand to England
  • Why he likes the Times Educational Supplement

The episode closes with a rant from me about teaching mathematics. I refer to the following books:

 

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 Presented and produced by Seán Delaney

Theme tune by David Vesey

On this week's programme I bring you the second part of my interview with Professor Barbara Schneider from Michigan State University. Among the topics discussed this week are the following:

  • The need to review the Irish science curriculum in line with other countries
  • How can a curriculum value both knowing and doing, especially doing
  • Her upcoming book titled, Learning Science (2020)
  • The role of family and school in aligning one’s education with one’s career choice (“aligned ambitions”) and how this led to the “College Ambition Program.”
  • Enhancing one’s career prospects with a “dual degree”
  • Educational outcomes v occupational outcomes
  • Fluidity of careers and implications for developing curriculum materials
  • How media influence career choices
  • Career paths of females
  • A typical working day for her
  • What schools are for
  • Two books she regularly returns to are Foundations of Social Theory and Flow

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Presented and produced by Seán Delaney

Theme tune by David Vesey

This week on the programme my guest is Professor Barbara Schneider from Michigan State University. She uses sociology and psychology in her work and talks about how that works. She discusses optimal learning moments in science teaching and learning and about helping students make transitions from middle school to high school. Here are my notes on some of the topics discussed:

  • How sociology has always about equal educational opportunity, access and social justice
  • The development of adolescence in context
  • How relationships created in school affect the inequality students experience in schools
  • Why relational trust in school is so important
  • The importance of student welfare
  • How they studied flow in the classroom
  • Converting flow into “optimal learning moments”
  • The “in it to win it” app and the College Ambition Program
  • How teachers can prepare for “optimal learning moments”
  • Why it’s important for children to learn science at school
  • A hybrid model of professional development for teachers
  • Problems with poorly-equipped science labs in schools

 Find out more about driving questions and project-based learning here.

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Presented and produced by Seán Delaney.

On this week's programme I bring you the second part of my interview with primary teacher and mathematics teacher educator, Claire Corroon. You can access resources and opinions about mathematics teaching on her website, Primary CPD. Among the topics we discuss this week are the following:

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Presented and produced by Seán Delaney.

This week my guest on the programme is Claire Corroon a primary teacher and teacher educator with a particular interest in mathematics education. She has many resources on her website, Primary CPD, where she also blogs. In this, the first part of our interview, among the topics discussed are:

  • How she got involved in mathematics education
  • Courses she gives for teachers in summer and at evenings
  • Number talks
  • Concrete, pictorial and abstract representations in mathematics
  • Her approach to teaching tables

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