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Presented and produced by Seán Delaney

Theme tune by David Vesey

On this week's programme I bring you the second and final part of my interview with Professor John P. Miller from the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education at the University of Toronto. John P. Miller is the author of The Holistic Curriculum, the third edition of which was recently published. Among the matters we discussed on the programme this week were:

  • The importance of examining our beliefs
  • The soul as the unconditioned self
  • The connection between holistic education and mental health
  • The relationship between holistic education and affective education, humanistic education, confluent education and transpersonal education.
  • The Holistic Ed Review started by Ron Miller
  • The lack of university programmes in holistic education up to doctoral level
  • What school is for
  • The Sudbury Valley School

People mentioned by John P. Miller

Books/authors mentioned on the programme:

Presented and produced by Seán Delaney

Theme tune by David Vesey

On this week's programme I speak to John P. (Jack) Miller, of the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education at the University of Toronto, and author of of The Holistic Curriculum, about holistic education. Among the topics discussed on the programme are:

  • What is holistic education?
  • In a tradition from indigenous people, Buddha, Socrates, Plato, Rousseau, Emerson, Thoreau, Peabody and Tolstoy up to Waldorf, Montessori and Reggio Emilia.
  • How The Equinox Holistic School in Toronto was inspired by and follows the ideas in Miller’s book, The Holistic Curriculum. The story of the school is told here.
  • Use of textbooks and a holistic curriculum
  • What is the experience of a holistic curriculum like for a student?
  • Autonomy for children in holistic education settings
  • Characteristics of teachers to teach holistically
  • Difference between teaching a subject holistically and teaching the same subject conventionally
  • Planning for holistic teaching
  • James Bean and integrated curriculum
  • Susan Drake and integrated curriculum
  • Relationship between holistic education and wisdom
  • The difference between contemplation and reflection and mindfulness
  • Religious education and spirituality education
  • The work of Thomas Moore on Spirituality and Education; also Parker Palmer and Rachel Kessler

 Presented and produced by Seán Delaney

Theme tune by David Vesey

On this week's programme I bring you the second part of my interview with Professor Barbara Schneider from Michigan State University. Among the topics discussed this week are the following:

  • The need to review the Irish science curriculum in line with other countries
  • How can a curriculum value both knowing and doing, especially doing
  • Her upcoming book titled, Learning Science (2020)
  • The role of family and school in aligning one’s education with one’s career choice (“aligned ambitions”) and how this led to the “College Ambition Program.”
  • Enhancing one’s career prospects with a “dual degree”
  • Educational outcomes v occupational outcomes
  • Fluidity of careers and implications for developing curriculum materials
  • How media influence career choices
  • Career paths of females
  • A typical working day for her
  • What schools are for
  • Two books she regularly returns to are Foundations of Social Theory and Flow

Presented and produced by Seán Delaney

Theme tune by David Vesey

This week on the programme my guest is Professor Barbara Schneider from Michigan State University. She uses sociology and psychology in her work and talks about how that works. She discusses optimal learning moments in science teaching and learning and about helping students make transitions from middle school to high school. Here are my notes on some of the topics discussed:

  • How sociology has always about equal educational opportunity, access and social justice
  • The development of adolescence in context
  • How relationships created in school affect the inequality students experience in schools
  • Why relational trust in school is so important
  • The importance of student welfare
  • How they studied flow in the classroom
  • Converting flow into “optimal learning moments”
  • The “in it to win it” app and the College Ambition Program
  • How teachers can prepare for “optimal learning moments”
  • Why it’s important for children to learn science at school
  • A hybrid model of professional development for teachers
  • Problems with poorly-equipped science labs in schools

 Find out more about driving questions and project-based learning here.

Presented and produced by Seán Delaney

Theme tune by David Vesey

On this week's programme I bring you the second part of my interview with Professor Lin Goodwin from the Faculty of Education at the University of Hong Kong. We continue the discussion we began on last week's programme about mentoring and progress onto other topics. Among the matters discussed this week are:

  • How to recognise when the moment is right for mentor input
  • What trends she perceives in the future of mentoring
  • Rounds as a practice in teacher education
  • Her work as Dean
  • How she uses her teaching skills in her work as Dean
  • Looking at education and teaching across cultures
  • Ruth Wong
  • Who and what inspires her

When I asked A. Lin Goodwin for her favourite book about education, she nominated, The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down, a book that was also recommended by Karen Hammerness when I spoke to her.

Presented and produced by Seán Delaney

Theme tune by David Vesey

On this week's programme I interview Professor A. Lin Goodwin, Dean of the Faculty of Education at the University of Hong Kong and formerly of Teachers College, Columbia University about mentoring and teaching. Among the topics we discuss are the following:

  • What mentoring is and is not
  • Everyone can be a mentor but people need to learn to mentor
  • Her experiences of being mentored by Celia Genishi
  • The kind of honesty that mentors need to have
  • The kind of feedback that is helpful
  • Skills and behaviours of mentors
  • Mentoring future researchers
  • Mentoring future teachers
  • Mentors learning from mentees
  • Letting mentees make mistakes
  • Problems if a mentor is reluctant to give candid feedback
  • Why having a framework or a mindset is better than having a formula for giving feedback
  • Getting away from looking at teaching dichotomously
  • Mentors for different occasions
  • Reluctant mentees
  • Some moments are more productive for mentoring than others

Presented and produced by Seán Delaney

Theme tune by David Vesey

This week on the programme I speak to Colm Byrne who graduated as a primary teacher from Marino Institute of Education in 2003 and two colleagues Sophen and Sowuen from Cambodia about education in Cambodia. They all work for the non governmental organisation See Beyond Borders. Among the topics we discuss are the following:

  • How Colm Byrne went to live and work in Cambodia
  • The state of education in Cambodia
  • Why teachers matter more than buildings at this time
  • Learning English in Cambodia
  • Children dropping out of school after second class
  • Support from the INTO, Irish Aid and Horseware
  • Horseware

Presented and produced by Seán Delaney

Theme tune by David Vesey

This week I am joined on the programme by Professor David Clarke and Dr. Man Ching Esther Chan from the Graduate School of Education at the University of Melbourne. We discussed many aspects of research and teaching, with a focus on mathematics, tasks, questioning and language. Among the topics discussed were:

  • Why a laboratory classroom was set up at the University of Melbourne
  • The social unit of learning research project
  • The layout of the laboratory classroom
  • Negotiating of meaning in mathematics tasks (e.g. meaning of average)
  • Using open ended tasks in teaching mathematics
  • Marking answers to open ended mathematical tasks
  • Involving students in assessing
  • Sources of open-ended tasks
    • If the area of an apartment is 60 square metres, what might the five-room apartment look like?
    • Picture a bar graph where all you have are the bars and the axes but no labels of any sort. What might this be a bar graph of? Label the bar graph and explain what information is contained in the graph.
    • The average age of a family of five people is 25 and one of them is the same age as you. Who might the people be? What are their ages? And how are they related to one another?
    • The average of five numbers is 17.2. What might the five numbers be?
    • A number is rounded off to 5.3. What might the number be?
  • The difference between good questions and good questioning
  • Asking the question, “what is your utility function?” (i.e. that which is maximised by a system)
  • Recognising the learning potential of student voice and cultural differences in how student voice is promoted and elicited
  • Finding tasks that link to the curriculum
  • The Lexicon project

Among the collaborators named by David and Esther were Peter Sullivan, and Neil Mercer. He also mentioned this paper on "initiating and Eliciting in Teaching: A reformulation of Telling" by Joanne Lobato, David Clarke and Amy Burns Ellis.

Presented and produced by Seán Delaney

Theme tune by David Vesey

This week on the programme I explore the area of postgraduate study in education. Why do a postgraduate accredited course? Where to do it? When is a good time to do it? How to choose it and ways to do it? Who to study with?

Such courses are addressed to the extent that they can be within a 30-minute course. To respond to any of the ideas raised, leave an idea on the programme's website or on Twitter using the handle, @insideed.

One website mentioned on the programme is the MOOC, Coursera.

Presented and produced by Seán Delaney

Theme tune by David Vesey

This week my guest is Thomas Moore who gave a talk on "The Inner Landscape of the Educator in Difficult Times" in Marino Institute of Education earlier this year. Among the topics we discussed are:

  • How as a culture we prefer training to education and the differences between them
  • Where he would like education to take place
  • Why the colours, sounds, images and textures around you matter when you learn
  • Source of curriculum: What does it mean to be an educated person?
  • What it requires of each of us to be human, to be good citizens
  • The spiritual nature of humans in our search for meaning
  • Having students go on a “pilgrimage” back to their childhood to get in touch with their essential selves
  • Aspects of spirituality religions have traditionally ignored in their emphases on dogmatism and moralism
  • Exploring basic questions through literature and the arts

He referred to Homer’s Odyssey, Horton Foote's play The Trip to Bountiful, and the poets Emily Dickinson, Wallace Stevens and John Keats.

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