Feed on
Posts

Archive for the 'Assessment' Category

Presented and produced by Seán Delaney.

In this episode I speak to two experts on curriculum integration from Brock University in Ontario, Canada, Professor Susan Drake and Dr. Joanne Reid. Among the topics we discuss are the following:

  • Multidisciplinary, interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary connections among subjects
  • SAMPLE TOPICS FOR INTEGRATION: War, water, homelessness, food waste in the cafeteria, traffic patterns in a school, sustainability, patterns, change, conflict, trace origin of everyday item (Coffee, chocolate etc.), medieval fair.
  • Finnish requirement that students do a phenomenon-based learning unit each year based around transversal competencies (21st century)
  • Project-based learning examples
  • Students present their work to an authentic audience
  • Finding themes for integration (look out your window!)
  • Project-based learning on Edutopia
  • Buck Institute and Project-based learning
  • Benefits of integration: more fun, students are engaged, fewer behaviour problems, social and emotional development, wellbeing, relevance, focus on whole person. Teachers who collaborate are more energised and creative
  • OECD Report: Curriculum Overload: A Way Forward.
  • Student achievement and integrated curricula
  • Obstacles to integration: textbooks, timetabling, subject-specific responsibilities,
  • Origin of Integrated teaching and its relation to constructivism which is relevant, interactive, real-world, choice, inquiry-based.
  • The Eight Year Study with Ralph Tyler, Hilda Taba and others. It was written up by Aikin.
  • Balancing integration and disciplinary integrity
  • Cross-curricular and teaching to the big ideas compared to integrated curriculum
  • Explanation of their curriculum framework: KDB: Know, Do, Be
  • Twenty-first century competencies: Communication (reading, writing, oral communication, listening, media literacy), critical thinking, creative thinking, collaboration, global competency, design thinking, digital skills, data literacy, financial literacy.
  • How they conduct research on integrated curriculum
  • Gordon Vars and research on integrated curriculum.
  • Bluewater study
  • What happened when standards/accountability model arrived in schools in the 1990s.
  • How the pandemic has impacted on assessment
  • Assessment and integration.
  • Benefits of students seeing the value of their work in the wider world (having an audience outside the classroom).
  • Finding out more about integrated curriculum and its history.
  • John Dewey and William Heard Kilpatrick and The Project Method.
  • James Beane.
  • Twenty-first century life skills
  • High Tech High
  • Getting started with integration : Genius Hour. More here.
  • Student-led teaching
  • How integrated curriculum is for students of all ages.
  • bell hooks
  • Inside the Black Box by Paul Black and Dylan William

In addition, Susan and Joanne compiled a list of resources with additional information about curriculum integration:

Drake, S. M. & Reid, J. L. (2020). How education can shape a new story in a post-pandemic world. Brock Education, 29(2), 6-12

 Drake, S. M. & Reid, J. L. (2020). 21st Century competencies in light of the history of integrated curriculum. In “Rethinking what has been rethought consistently over the millennia: A global perspective on the future of education”. Frontiers in Education Journal, 5(122), 1-10. https://doi.org/10.3389/feduc.2020.00122

Drake, S.M. & Reid, J.L. (in press). Integrated curriculum In J. Flinders & P, Hiebowitsh (Eds.) Routledge Encyclopedia of Education. New York: Routledge

Drake, S.M. & Reid, J. L. (2018). Integrated curriculum as an effective way to teach 21st Century capabilities. Asia Pacific Journal of Educational Research, 1(1), https://doi.org/10.0000/APJER.2018.1.1.031

Drake, S.M. & Reid, J. L. (2018). Integrated curriculum for the 21st Century. In J. Miller, M. Binder, S. Crowell, K. Nigh and B. Novak (Eds). International handbook in holistic education (pp.118-128) New York: Routledge.

Drake, S.M. & Reid, J. L. (2017). Interdisciplinary assessment in the 21st Century.

                  file:///Users/sdrake/Desktop/IEJEE_57fa80bd928bb_last_article_57fa813187fad.pdfIn Steve Pec (Ed). Scholarship of teaching and learning Part 3 (pp. 1-8) Stuyvesant Falls, NY: Rapid Intellect Group. http://www.rapidintellect.com/AE/ec5771v14.pdf

Savage, M. & Drake, S. (2016). Living transdisciplinarity: Teachers’ experiences with the International Baccalaurete Primary years Programme. International Electronic Journal of Elementary Education. (19), 1-19, file:///Users/sdrake/Desktop/IEJEE_57fa80bd928bb_last_article_57fa813187fad.pdf

Drake, S.M. & Savage, M. (2016). Negotiating accountability and integrated curriculum in a global context. International Journal of Learning, Teaching, and Educational Research, 15, 6. http://www.ijlter.org/index.php/ijlter/article/view/639

Drake, S.M. (2015).  Designing across the curriculum for “sustainable well-being”: A 21st Century approach. In F. Deer, T. Falkenberg, B. McMillan & L. Simms (Eds.). Sustainable Well-Being: Concepts, Issues, and Educational Practice (pp. 57-77). Winnipeg, MB: EWSB Press. http://www.eswb-press.org/uploads/1/2/8/9/12899389/sustainable_well-being_2014.pdf

Drake. S. M., Reid, J. L., & Kolohon, W. (2014). Interweaving curriculum and classroom assessment Engaging students for the 21st century. Don Mills, ON: Oxford University Press.

Drake S & Burns R. (2004). Meeting standards with integrated curriculum. Alexandria, VA:ASCD. Susan says “it is the easiest "how to" book” and Joanne agrees. It is almost like a manual. Very good even if it seems old now.

Project-based learning – sites for ideas

https://www.pblworks.org/what-is-pbl

https://www.prodigygame.com/main-en/blog/project-based-learning/

https://www.edutopia.org/project-based-learning

https://iearn.org  (collaborative international projects)

 

Read Full Post »

Presented and produced by Seán Delaney.

On this week's episode I speak to Professor Yong Zhao from the School of Education at the University of Kansas. Among the topics we discuss on the episode are the following:

  • We currently have the opportunity to reimagine education without schools: Do we have to do these subjects? Do we have to teach this much?
  • A good time to teach global understanding, empathy and competency
  • Innovation in education
  • The importance of having an entrepreneurial mindset
  • The Digital Pencil
  • Alternative ways of organising the education of young people
  • Difficulty of finding like-minded people in a small school
  • Globalisation as the “death of physical distance”
  • Globalisation is localisation of global forces
  • Implications of globalisation for teachers
  • Why everyone should have a local identity and affirm the identities of others
  • Your uniqueness can only become valuable when it’s valuable to others
  • Why schools encourage people to be independent and selfish rather than interdependent
  • Schools as a place to bring about a better society
  • Students as job creators versus job hunters
  • Enhancing entrepreneurship in students
  • Unintended consequences of education policies
  • PISA test scores and the illusions of excellence, science, progress.
  • His experience of being educated in China
  • The impact of technology on education
  • To compete with a machine, a person must avoid becoming one!
  • Be unique and great in your own way; understand yourself, your talents and virtues.
  • "Creative" means identifying problems worth solving
  • Empty creativity versus good creativity – the need to have a domain to excel in
  • What schools should be for: a place to equalise community resources
  • David Berliner and Bruce J. Biddle The Manufactured Crisis.
  • David Berliner as a former guest on the podcast
  • Diane Ravitch’s blog: https://dianeravitch.net/
  • If we want a better life in the future, we need to help our children create a better life for us

Read Full Post »

Presented and produced by Seán Delaney

On this week's podcast I bring you my interview with Alfie Kohn, who writes and speaks about education, especially in areas such as homework, standardised testing and punishments and rewards. Among the items we discuss on the podcast are the following:

  • Fostering students’ curiosity and encouraging them to think deeply
  • Teachers participating with children in an exploration of ideas to move beyond factual knowledge
  • How teachers can teach to promote students’ thinking
  • The inverse relationship between teacher control and student learning
  • Why learning starts with a question
  • John Dewey, Jean Piaget, Ed Deci and Richard Ryan (Self-determination theory)
  • Why rewards and punishment don’t help children learn
  • Why saying “Good job” to your students is the equivalent of a “verbal doggy biscuit”
  • Children who are frequently praised are less generous than their peers
  • How children know when they’re being controlled and how they respond to it
  • How teachers can respond to students’ work and respect the child’s autonomy
  • Implementing a no-homework policy in a school
  • Why he believes that giving homework to children constitutes malpractice.
  • Excitement (about learning) drives excellence
  • Standardised tests and teacher accountability; Authentic assessments – tap into projects done by students over time
  • Why standardised teaching tells you only two things: (i) how much time was given to teaching test taking and (ii) how big the houses are near the school.
  • Differences between role of parent and teacher: Unconditional parenting and unconditional teaching
  • Punished by Rewards
  • Unconditional Parenting

Read Full Post »

Presented and produced by Seán Delaney

This week I bring you the second part of my interview with writer, blogger, speaker, trainer and former English teacher David Didau. We focus particularly on his book, What if everything you knew about education was wrong? Among the topics discussed are the following:

  • How teachers can use research
  • Why less feedback is more
  • Carol Dweck’s research on mindsets
  • The difficulties in telling if what children learn is retained or transferable
  • Why a sat-nav is the perfect “assessment for learning machine”
  • The illusion of knowledge
  • Assessment for learning
  • Why testing should be rebranded as quizzing
  • Why differentiation is a “dark art”

Read Full Post »

Presented and produced by Seán Delaney.

On this week's programme the distinguished Educational Psychologist, Professor David C Berliner, who is Regents Professor Emeritus at Arizona State University, shares more of his ideas and reflections about education. Among the topics he discusses this week are assessment literacy, the instructional sensitivity of tests, why he would hesitate in using international comparative tests to shape education policy, and the attractiveness of teaching as a career.

·      

Read Full Post »

Presented and produced by Seán Delaney.

On this week's programme Ciara Brennan, a teacher in St. Peter's Primary School in Bray and a part-time lecturer in Marino Institute of Education, talks about her use of technology for assessment in her class and to motivate her pupils. She presented a workshop with Mary Jo Bell at the 2016 annual conference of the Computers in Education Society of Ireland.

Among the websites mentioned by Ciara were the following:
Kahoot (for students)
Kahoot (for teachers)
Socrative
Padlet
Animoto
Bett

Read Full Post »

Presented and produced by Seán Delaney.

On this week's programme I bring you the second part of my interview with Dr. Michael O'Leary from St. Patrick's College on the topic of assessment. I also speak to Susan Marron from St. Patrick's College about the topic of fitness testing of children. Susan Marron is Chairperson of the Irish Primary PE Association.

Read Full Post »

Presented and produced by Seán Delaney.

On this week's programme I spoke to Dr. Michael O'Leary, from St. Patrick's College, about assessment. Our conversation lasted longer than the programme so I'll bring you the remainder of the interview on next week's programme.

Read Full Post »

Presented and produced by Seán Delaney

On this week's programme I spoke to Dr. Eemer Eivers, research fellow, and Aidan Clerkin, research associate, at the Educational Research Centre at St. Patrick's College about the performance of Irish fourth class children on the PIRLS and TIMSS tests. In the tests Irish children's performance on reading, maths and science was compared with the performance of children in up to 50 other countries. The guests authored the Irish report, which can be viewed here.

Read Full Post »

Presented and produced by Seán Delaney

On this week's programme Professor Deborah Loewenberg Ball, who is Dean of the School of Education at the University of Michigan and Director of Teaching Works talks about her research on teacher education. She also shares her impression of Irish education and tells us what the current hot topics are in U.S. education. She was in Ireland as a guest of the Marino Institute of Education and the National Council for Curriculum and Assessment. You can watch a podcast of her talks to Irish educators here.

Read Full Post »

Play this podcast on Podbean App